Surveying Post COVID Change

Urban life is evolving fast, national politics is in steep decline

Mike Meyer

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Photo by Steve Douglas on Unsplash

by Mike Meyer ~ Honolulu ~ May 16, 2020

The depth and breadth of change from the pre-COVID-19 world is a planetary metamorphosis. It is safe to say that we will all spend the rest of our lives working to understand and redefine ourselves in this new order.

These early days are hard, and all the dust from the ongoing collapse of the old world makes it dangerous and difficult to see. We still have a significant part of the population struggling to pretend that the previous world will somehow spring back to life and carry on in all its waste, extreme wealth, and poverty.

Usually, these are the people, a shrinking minority who became rich and powerful beyond their dreams in the twisted distortions of late-stage, extreme capitalism. The most significant related group is the population, desperately clinging to the illusion of the American middle class that makes up the new precariat. Most of these bought the fantasy of a future return to middle-class America that was fabricated by the ruling elite to protect their ownership.

The bulk of the educated and professional population understands how tenuous this had become and now hangs between insecurity, depression, and fear of descent to full precariat status. The burden of understanding is knowing that the pandemic has both only begun and is a component of a much bigger complex of changes, most of which will produce a growing cascade of disasters into the foreseeable future.

Although the cataclysmic failures of the old governmental and economic systems triggered by the pandemic dominate the elite owned media, most people are facing hard personal and immediate family choices. How much of our old ways will return and when, plus what will not return, requiring significant personal and family changes?

Political and economic collapse is simply an escalation of the previous decline of the US and other extreme capitalist countries. Both systems have lost any semblance of democratic control by or relevance to the general population. The real issues are local and close to home. Increasing awareness of the extent of the changes only raises more questions for people with answers still…

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Mike Meyer

Writer, Educator, Campus CIO (retired) . Essays on our changing reality here, news and more at https://rlandok.substack.com/